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  1. Datasets for: A Pluto-Charon Sonata: Dynamical Limits on the Masses of the Small Satellites

    Work
    Description: --------------------- DATA & FILE OVERVIEW --------------------- Files summarized in items 1-8 are binary output files from n-body simulations as described in Kenyon & Bromley, "A Pluto-Charon Sonata: Dynamical Limits on fate Masses of the Small Satellites" (2019, Astronomical Journal). Files described in item 9 are ascii txt. The C programs in items 10, 11, and 12 provide different ways to access the binary output. Each C program describes the architecture of the binary files. 1. pcs2-0mmm-nnn[a-z] files: heavy satellites, mmm = 100 x mass factor for all satellites, nnn = number of Symplectic steps per PC orbit, a-z = version 2. pcs2-1mmm-nnn[a-z] files: light satellites, mmm = 100 x mass factor for all satellites, nnn = number of Symplectic steps per PC orbit, a-z = version 3. pcs2-2mmm-nnn[a-z] files: light satellites with 2x nominal mass of Styx & Kerberos, mmm = 100 x mass factor for all satellites, nnn = number of Symplectic steps per PC orbit, a-z = version 4. pcs2-3mmm: heavy satellites, 40 Symplectic steps per PC orbit, mmm = 100 x mass factor for Nix only 5. pcs2-4mmm: heavy satellites, 40 Symplectic steps per PC orbit, mmm = 100 x mass factor for Kerberos only 6. pcs2-5mmm: heavy satellites, 40 Symplectic steps per PC orbit, mmm = 100 x mass factor for Hydra only 7. pcs2-6mmm light satellites, 40 Symplectic steps per PC orbit, mmm = 100 x mass factor for Nix only 8. pcs2-7mmm: light satellites, 40 Symplectic steps per PC orbit, mmm = 100 x mass factor for Hydra only 9. pcs2-n000.dat: summary of lifetimes for binary files in each archive 10. lifetime.c: summarizes lifetime and mass factor for binary file usage example: "lifetime pcs2-6110" 11. summary.c: generates basic summary of timesteps in a binary file usage example: "summary pcs1-0013d" 12. extrxyz.c: extracts (x,y,z) for N satellites and outputs (x,y,z) usage example: "extr6d pcs1-6110 6" will output (x,y,z) for SNKH 3. Additional related data collected that was not included in the current data package: There are other binary output files not included in this archive. 4. Are there multiple versions of the dataset? no -------------------------- METHODOLOGICAL INFORMATION -------------------------- 1. Description of methods used for collection/generation of data: The data were generated by computer simulations using the C++ code "Orchestra", a proprietary hybrid code that follows the dynamical evolution of solids and gas orbiting a central object. Algorithms in the code are described in the following papers (author names abbreviated to B for Bromley, K for Kenyon, and L for Jane X Luu along with a year for publication date, AJ = Astronomical Journal, ApJ = Astrophysical Journal, S=Supplement): KL1998, AJ 115:2136; KL1999, AJ 118:1101; KB2001,AJ 121:538; KB2002,AJ 123:1757; KB2004, AJ 127:513; BK2006, AJ 131:2737; KB2006, AJ 131:1837; KB2008, ApJS 179:451; KB2010, ApJS 188:242; BK2011, ApJ 731:101; KB2012, AJ 143:63; KB2014, AJ 147:8. Initial conditions for these simulations described in the published paper. 2. Methods for processing the data: Various C and fortran programs are used to analyze the data for the calculations. Several C programs needed to extract information from the computer generated binary output files are included with the dataset. The C programs include basic summaries of the structure of the data files and the usage to extract data from each binary file. 3. Instrument- or software-specific information needed to interpret the data: Appropriate software is included in directory. 4. Standards and calibration information, if appropriate: none 5. Environmental/experimental conditions: all calculations were run on the NASA discover cluster 6. Describe any quality-assurance procedures performed on the data: Aside from tests summarized in the papers described in item 1, test calculations are summarized in the Appendix of each paper and compared to an appropriate benchmark. 7. People involved with sample collection, processing, analysis and/or submission: Scott Kenyon and Ben Bromley
    Keyword: planets and satellites: dynamical evolution and stability; Pluto and Charon
    Creator: Kenyon, Scott and Bromley, Benjamin
    Owner: Benjamin Bromley
    Date Uploaded: 05/20/2019
    Date Modified: 05/24/2019
    Date Created: 2018-2019
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-HAJT-E0G0
    Contact Email: bromley@physics.utah.edu
    Funders: NASA
  2. Data for: Authigenic Mineral Textures in Submarine 1979 Basalt Drill Core, Surtsey Volcano, Iceland

    Work
    Description: Micrometer-scale maps of authigenic microstructures in submarine basaltic tuff from a 1979 Surtsey volcano, Iceland, drill core acquired 15 years after eruptions terminated describe the initial alteration of oceanic basalt in a low temperature hydrothermal system. An integrative investigative approach uses synchrotron source X-ray microdiffraction (µXRD), microfluoresence (µXRF), micro-computed tomography (µCT), and scanning transmission electron microscopy (S/TEM) coupled with Raman spectroscopy to create finely resolved spatial frameworks that record a continuum of alteration in glass and olivine. Micro-analytical maps of vesicular and fractured lapilli in specimens from 157.1, 137.9, and 102.6 m depth, and borehole temperatures of 83, 93.9 and 141.3 °C measured in 1980, respectively, describe the production of nanocrystalline clay mineral, zeolites, and Al-tobermorite in diverse microenvironments. Irregular alteration fronts at 157.1 m depth resemble microchannels associated with biological activity in older basalts. By contrast, linear microstructures with little resemblance to previously described alteration features have nanocrystalline clay mineral (nontronite) and zeolite (amicite) texture. The crystallographic preferred orientation rotates around an axis parallel to the linear feature. Raman spectra indicating degraded and poorly-ordered carbonaceous matter of possible biological origin are associated with nanocrystalline clay mineral in a crystallographically-oriented linear microstructure in altered olivine at 102.6 m and with sub-circular nanoscale cavities in altered glass at 137.9 m depth. Although evidence for biotic processes is inconclusive, the integrated analyses describe the complex organization of previously unrecognized mineral texture in very young basalt. They provide a foundational mineralogical reference for longitudinal, time-lapse characterizations of palagonitized basalt in oceanic environments.
    Keyword: Submarine basalt, Glass alteration, Micrometer-scale maps, X-ray microdiffraction, Surtsey volcano
    Creator: Tamura, Nobumichi, Parkinson, Dula, Stan, Camelia V. , Czabaj, Michael W., Jackson, Marie D., Miyagi, Lowell M. , Moore, James G. , Couper, Samantha, and Ivarsson, Magnus
    Owner: Marie Jackson
    Location: Surtsey volcano, Iceland
    Date Uploaded: 05/21/2019
    Date Modified: 05/24/2019
    Date Created: 2016-2019
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Other
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-VJND-8V00
    Contact Email: m.d.jackson@utah.edu
    Funders: The College of Mines and Earth Sciences at University of Utah provided funding support. This research made use of University of Utah USTAR shared facilities supported, in part, by the MRSEC Program of NSF under Award No. DMR-1121252. Data acquired at ALS beamlines 12.3.2. and 8.3.2 at Lawrence Berkeley Laboratories were supported by the Director of the Office of Science, Department of Energy, under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.
  3. Dataset for NSF grant: Jurassic Navajo Sandstone - Moab Utah area localities

    Work
    Description: This project was a NSF-funded collaborative research project entitled: Collaborative Research: Deciphering Eolian Paleoenvironmental and Hydrodynamic records: Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, Colorado Plateau, USA This was a multifaceted interdisciplinary study of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone (Ss)--a unique and distinctive unit in all of geologic history. This unit represents the largest known ancient desert (erg), and is typically classified as a record of a hyperarid environment. Furthermore, the Navajo Ss was deposited at a time when mammals were undergoing their first major diversification, and dinosaurs began to dominate the landscape in number and diversity. Our goal was to examine sedimentary features of the erg margin that recorded the active paleohydrology of the desert regime, and examine abundant trace- and body-fossil material to more fully document the structure and evolution of the biota in a variably arid landscape through Navajo Ss deposition. Field studies involved sedimentology and paleoecology. Laboratory studies involved isotope geochemistry of carbonate deposits, as well as thin section petrography.
    Keyword: eolian, Utah, Moab, sedimentology, geology, paleoecology, Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, and field study
    Creator: Chan, Marjorie A.
    Owner: Marjorie Chan
    Location: Moab, Utah
    Date Uploaded: 03/25/2019
    Date Modified: 04/05/2019
    Date Created: May 2015-May 2017
    Rights: Public Domain – This data is free of copyright restrictions (e.g. government sponsored data).
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi:10.7278/S50D-D7DX-GJG0
    Contact Email: marjorie.chan@utah.edu
    Funders: Canyonlands Natural History Association and U.S. National Science Foundation
  4. Data to support: Phylogenetic and biogeographic controls of plant nighttime stomatal conductance

    Work
    Description: • The widely documented phenomenon of nighttime stomatal conductance (gsn) could lead to substantial water loss with no carbon gain, and thus it remains unclear whether nighttime stomatal conductance confers a functional advantage. Given that studies of gsn have focused on controlled environments or small numbers of species in natural environments, a broad phylogenetic and biogeographic context could provide insights into potential adaptive benefits of gsn. • We measured gsn on a diverse suite of species (n = 73) across various functional groups and climates-of-origin in a common garden to study the phylogenetic and biogeographic/climatic controls on gsn and further assessed the degree to which gsn co-varied with leaf functional traits and daytime gas exchange rates. • Closely related species were more similar in gsn than expected by chance. Herbaceous species had higher gsn than woody species. Species that typically grow in climates with lower mean annual precipitation – where the fitness cost of water loss should be the highest – generally had higher gsn. • Our results reveal the highest gsn rates in species from environments where neighboring plants compete most strongly for water, suggesting a possible role for the competitive advantage of gsn.
    Keyword: nighttime stomata, competition, biogeographic, herbaceous species, woody species, adaption, water resource, gas exchange, phylogenetic, and climate controls
    Creator: Anderegg, William and Yu, Kailiang
    Owner: Kailiang Yu
    Location: Red Butte Garden, Salt Lake City, Utah
    Date Uploaded: 02/04/2019
    Date Modified: 02/19/2019
    Date Created: 2018 May through August
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-E9J1-NYG0
    Contact Email: anderegg@utah.edu
    Funders: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Programme, Ecosystem Services and Agro-ecosystem Management, University of Utah Global Change and Sustainability Center, David and Lucille Packard Foundation, and U.S. National Science Foundation
  5. Data for Almishaal et al. “Reactive Oxygen Species and Hearing Loss in Murine CMV Labyrinthitis" 2019

    Work
    Description: The data set includes individual images of mouse cochleae, both scanning electron micrographs and fluorescent micrographs, used to generate aggregated data described in Ali A. Almishaal; Phayvanh P. Sjogren; Pranav D. Mathur; Elaine Hillas;Taelor Johnson; Melissa S. Price; Travis Haller; Jun Yang; Namakkal S. Rajasekaran; Matthew A. Firpo; Albert H. Park (2018) "Reactive Oxygen Species and Hearing Loss in Murine CMV Labyrinthitis".
    Keyword: congenital CMV, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, herpesviridae, antioxidant, cochlea, outer hair cells, cytomegalovirus, hearing loss, reactive oxygen species, auditory brainstem response, and mouse
    Creator: Firpo, Matthew A.
    Owner: Matthew Firpo
    Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Date Uploaded: 05/23/2018
    Date Modified: 01/08/2019
    Date Created: 04082015-11022016
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-D0WT-SV00
    Contact Email: matt.firpo@hsc.utah.edu
    Funders: NIH EY014800, NIH EY020853, Triological Society Career Development Award, and Research to Prevent Blindness Fund
  6. Data for: Restitution Characteristics of His Bundle and Working Myocardium in Isolated Rabbit Hearts

    Work
    Description: The Purkinje system (PS) and the His bundle have been recently implicated as an important driver of the rapid activation rate after 1-2 minutes of ventricular fibrillation (VF). It is unknown whether activations during VF propagate through the His-Purkinje system to other portions of the the working myocardium (WM). Little is known about restitution characteristic differences between the His bundle and working myocardium at short cycle lengths. In this study, rabbit hearts (n=9) were isolated, Langendorff- perfused, and electromechanically uncoupled with blebbistatin (10 μM). Pacing pulses were delivered directly to the His bundle. By using standard glass microelectrodes, action potentials duration (APD) from the His bundle and WM were obtained simultaneously over a wide range of stimulation cycle lengths (CL). The global F-test indicated that the two restitution curves of the His bundle and the WM are statistically significantly different (P<0.05). Also, the APD of the His bundle was significantly shorter than that of WM throughout the whole pacing course (P<0.001). The CL at which alternans developed in the His bundle vs. the WM were shorter for the His bundle (134.2±13.1ms vs. 148.3±13.3ms, P<0.01) and 2:1 block developed at a shorter CL in the His bundle than in WM (130.0±10.0 vs. 145.6±14.2ms, P<0.01). The His bundle APD was significantly shorter than that of WM under both slow and rapid pacing rates, which suggest that there may be an excitable gap during VF and that the His bundle may conduct wavefronts from one bundle branch to the other at short cycle lengths and during VF.
    Keyword: action potential duration, cardiology, microelectrode, His bundle, alternans, working myocardium, rabbit, ventricular fibrillation, and restitution curve
    Creator: Hu, Nan, Huang, Shangwei, Ranjan, Ravi, Panitchob, Nuttanont, Huang, Liqun, and Dosdall, Derek
    Owner: Nuttanont Panitchob
    Publisher: The Hive: University of Utah Data Repository
    Location: Salt Lake City, UT
    Date Uploaded: 10/12/2017
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: 20160321 to 20160525
    Rights: CCO – As the data author, you are choosing to place your data into the public domain.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50R9MJX
    Contact Email: Derek.Dosdall@utah.edu
    Funders: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health
  7. Observing and Modeling Downslope-Windstorm-Type Flow in a Small-Scale Crater Induced by Larger-Scale Katabatic Winds

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    Description: Supplementary material for a research paper submitted to the Journal of Applied Meteorology and Climatology. An animated gif and a readme file.
    Keyword: basin, Meteor Crater, potential temperature profile, METCRAX , hydralic jump, IOP7, katabatic flow, weather, flow, animination, and cold intrusions
    Creator: Kalthoff, N, Lehner, M., Haiden, T., Adler, B. , Whiteman, C. David, and Hoch, S. W.
    Owner: C Whiteman
    Publisher: The Hive: University of Utah Data Repository
    Location: Meteor Crater, Arizona
    Date Uploaded: 10/10/2017
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: October 10, 2017
    Rights: Public Domain – This data is free of copyright restrictions (e.g. government sponsored data).
    Resource Type: Image
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S54J0C86
    Contact Email: dave.whiteman@utah.edu
    Funders: National Science Foundation