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  1. Dataset for NSF grant: Jurassic Navajo Sandstone - Moab Utah area localities

    Work
    Description: This project was a NSF-funded collaborative research project entitled: Collaborative Research: Deciphering Eolian Paleoenvironmental and Hydrodynamic records: Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, Colorado Plateau, USA This was a multifaceted interdisciplinary study of the Lower Jurassic Navajo Sandstone (Ss)--a unique and distinctive unit in all of geologic history. This unit represents the largest known ancient desert (erg), and is typically classified as a record of a hyperarid environment. Furthermore, the Navajo Ss was deposited at a time when mammals were undergoing their first major diversification, and dinosaurs began to dominate the landscape in number and diversity. Our goal was to examine sedimentary features of the erg margin that recorded the active paleohydrology of the desert regime, and examine abundant trace- and body-fossil material to more fully document the structure and evolution of the biota in a variably arid landscape through Navajo Ss deposition. Field studies involved sedimentology and paleoecology. Laboratory studies involved isotope geochemistry of carbonate deposits, as well as thin section petrography.
    Keyword: eolian, Utah, Moab, sedimentology, geology, paleoecology, Jurassic Navajo Sandstone, and field study
    Creator: Chan, Marjorie A.
    Owner: Marjorie Chan
    Location: Moab, Utah
    Date Uploaded: 03/25/2019
    Date Modified: 04/05/2019
    Date Created: May 2015-May 2017
    Rights: Public Domain – This data is free of copyright restrictions (e.g. government sponsored data).
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi:10.7278/S50D-D7DX-GJG0
    Contact Email: marjorie.chan@utah.edu
    Funders: Canyonlands Natural History Association and U.S. National Science Foundation
  2. Data to support: Phylogenetic and biogeographic controls of plant nighttime stomatal conductance

    Work
    Description: • The widely documented phenomenon of nighttime stomatal conductance (gsn) could lead to substantial water loss with no carbon gain, and thus it remains unclear whether nighttime stomatal conductance confers a functional advantage. Given that studies of gsn have focused on controlled environments or small numbers of species in natural environments, a broad phylogenetic and biogeographic context could provide insights into potential adaptive benefits of gsn. • We measured gsn on a diverse suite of species (n = 73) across various functional groups and climates-of-origin in a common garden to study the phylogenetic and biogeographic/climatic controls on gsn and further assessed the degree to which gsn co-varied with leaf functional traits and daytime gas exchange rates. • Closely related species were more similar in gsn than expected by chance. Herbaceous species had higher gsn than woody species. Species that typically grow in climates with lower mean annual precipitation – where the fitness cost of water loss should be the highest – generally had higher gsn. • Our results reveal the highest gsn rates in species from environments where neighboring plants compete most strongly for water, suggesting a possible role for the competitive advantage of gsn.
    Keyword: nighttime stomata, competition, biogeographic, herbaceous species, woody species, adaption, water resource, gas exchange, phylogenetic, and climate controls
    Creator: Anderegg, William and Yu, Kailiang
    Owner: Kailiang Yu
    Location: Red Butte Garden, Salt Lake City, Utah
    Date Uploaded: 02/04/2019
    Date Modified: 02/19/2019
    Date Created: 2018 May through August
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-E9J1-NYG0
    Contact Email: anderegg@utah.edu
    Funders: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Programme, Ecosystem Services and Agro-ecosystem Management, University of Utah Global Change and Sustainability Center, David and Lucille Packard Foundation, and U.S. National Science Foundation
  3. Supporting data for 'Tree carbon allocation explains forest drought-kill and recovery patterns'.

    Work
    Description: The mechanisms governing tree drought mortality and recovery remain a subject of inquiry and active debate given their role in the terrestrial carbon cycle and their concomitant impact on climate change. Counter-intuitively, many trees do not die during the drought itself. Indeed, observations globally have documented that trees often grow for several years after drought before mortality. A combination of meta-analysis and tree physiological models demonstrate that optimal carbon allocation after drought explains observed patterns of delayed tree mortality and provides a predictive recovery framework. Specifically, post-drought, trees attempt to repair water transport tissue and achieve positive carbon balance through regrowing drought-damaged xylem. Further, the number of years of xylem regrowth required to recover function increases with tree size, explaining why drought mortality increases with size. These results indicate that tree resilience to drought-kill may increase in the future, provided that CO2 fertilization facilitates more rapid xylem regrowth.
    Keyword: drought, optimality theory, hydraulic-carbon coupling, CO2 fertilization, carbon metabolism, and vegetation model
    Creator: Schwalm, C., Detto, M., Bartlett, M. K., Schahher, B., Anderegg, W. R. L., Trugman, Anna T., Medvigy, D., and Pacala, S. W.
    Owner: Anna Trugman
    Date Uploaded: 08/08/2018
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: Spring 2018
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S5N29V4F
    Contact Email: a.trugman@utah.edu
    Funders: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Grant No. 2017-07164
  4. BIG-LoVE data

    Work
    Description: Background. Common cold viruses create significant health and financial burdens, and understanding key loci of transmission would help focus control strategies. This study (1) examines factors that influence when individuals transition from a negative to positive test (acquisition) or a positive to negative test (loss) of rhinovirus (HRV) and other respiratory tract viruses in 26 households followed weekly for one year, (2) investigates evidence for intrahousehold and interhousehold transmission and the characteristics of individuals implicated in transmission, and (3) builds data-based simulation models to identify factors that most strongly affect patterns of prevalence. Methods. We detected HRV, coronavirus, paramyxovirus, influenza and bocavirus with the FilmArray polymerase chain reaction (PCR) platform (BioFire Diagnostics, LLC). We used logistic regression to find covariates affecting acquisition or loss of HRV including demographic characteristics of individuals, their household, their current infection status, and prevalence within their household and across the population. We apply generalized linear mixed models to test robustness of results. Results. Acquisition of HRV was less probable in older individuals and those infected with a coronavirus, and higher with a higher proportion of other household members infected. Loss of HRV is reduced with a higher proportion of other household members infected. Within households, only children and symptomatic individuals show evidence for transmission, while between households only a higher number of infected older children (ages 5-19) increases the probability of acquisition. Coronaviruses, paramyxoviruses and bocavirus also show evidence of intrahousehold transmission. Simulations show that age-dependent susceptibility and transmission have the largest effects on mean HRV prevalence. Conclusions. Children are most likely to acquire and most likely to transmit HRV both within and between households, with infectiousness concentrated in symptomatic children. Simulations predict that the spread of HRV and other respiratory tract viruses can be reduced but not eliminated by practices within the home.
    Keyword: viral epidemiology, longitudinal study, Utah, viral interactions, epidemiology, coronavirus, rhinovirus, respiratory disease, and respiratory tract virus
    Creator: Frederick R. Adler
    Contributor: Andrew Pavia, Carrie L. Byington, and Krow Ampofo
    Owner: Frederick Adler
    Location: Salt Lake City
    Date Uploaded: 07/05/2018
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: August 2009 - August 2010
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S5XG9P97
    Contact Email: adler@math.utah.edu
    Funders: National Institutes of Health (NIH)/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases, 21st Century Science Initiative Grant from the James S McDonnell Foundation, The HA and Edna Benning Presidential Endowment, The Primary Children's Hospital Foundation, NIH/National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences, NIH/National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, and Pediatric Clinical and Translational Scholars Program
  5. Supplemental data for 'Soil moisture drought as a major driver of carbon cycle uncertainty", Geophysical Research Letters

    Work
    Description: Future projections suggest an increase in drought globally with climate change. Current vegetation models typically regulate the plant photosynthetic response to soil moisture stress through an empirical function, rather than a mechanistic response where plant water potentials respond to changes in soil water. This representation of soil moisture stress may introduce significant uncertainty into projections for the terrestrial carbon cycle. We examined the use of the soil moisture limitation function in historical and future emissions scenarios in nine Earth system models. We found that soil moisture-limited productivity across models represented a large and uncertain component of the simulated carbon cycle, comparable to 3-286% of current global productivity. Approximately 40-80% of the intermodel variability was due to the functional form of the limitation equation alone. Our results highlight the importance of implementing mechanistic water limitation schemes in models and illuminate several avenues for improving projections of the land carbon sink.
    Keyword: carbon cycle, Water limitation , drought, Gross primary productivity, soil moisture, and Earth system modeling
    Creator: Anderegg, William R.L., Mankin, Justin S., Medvigy, David, and Trugman, Anna T.
    Owner: Anna Trugman
    Date Uploaded: 06/25/2018
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: Spring 2016
    Rights: CC BY – Allows others to use and share your data, even commercially, with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S5707ZMS
    Contact Email: a.trugman@utah.edu
    Funders: USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture, Agricultural and Food Research Initiative Competitive Programme, Ecosystem Services and Agro-ecosystem Management, grant no. 2017-05521, National Science Foundation grant 1714972, US Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Biological and Environmental Research, Terrestrial Ecosystem Science (TES) Program award DE-SC0014363 , National Science Foundation Award 1151102 , and USDA National Institute of Food and Agriculture Postdoctoral Research Fellowship Grant No. 2017-07164
  6. Data for Almishaal et al. “Reactive Oxygen Species and Hearing Loss in Murine CMV Labyrinthitis" 2019

    Work
    Description: The data set includes individual images of mouse cochleae, both scanning electron micrographs and fluorescent micrographs, used to generate aggregated data described in Ali A. Almishaal; Phayvanh P. Sjogren; Pranav D. Mathur; Elaine Hillas;Taelor Johnson; Melissa S. Price; Travis Haller; Jun Yang; Namakkal S. Rajasekaran; Matthew A. Firpo; Albert H. Park (2018) "Reactive Oxygen Species and Hearing Loss in Murine CMV Labyrinthitis".
    Keyword: congenital CMV, distortion-product otoacoustic emissions, herpesviridae, antioxidant, cochlea, outer hair cells, cytomegalovirus, hearing loss, reactive oxygen species, auditory brainstem response, and mouse
    Creator: Firpo, Matthew A.
    Owner: Matthew Firpo
    Location: Salt Lake City, Utah, USA
    Date Uploaded: 05/23/2018
    Date Modified: 01/08/2019
    Date Created: 04082015-11022016
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50D-D0WT-SV00
    Contact Email: matt.firpo@hsc.utah.edu
    Funders: NIH EY014800, NIH EY020853, Triological Society Career Development Award, and Research to Prevent Blindness Fund
  7. Data related to electric field enhancements along ocean-continent boundaries during space weather hazards.

    Work
    Description: This dataset contains the electric field data sampled along ocean-continent boundaries during space weather hazards. A finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) technique is used to study potential space weather hazards to electric power grids located at the proximity of the coast. The most of the data are in floating point representation, and the data files are in .txt format. The data can be visualized using software such as MATLAB and Python. The data can be used to plot electric and magnetic fields along the ocean-continent boundaries for different scenarios (different depths of an ocean, different conductivities of a lithosphere and different frequencies of ionospheric disturbance).
    Keyword: Electric field, United States coast, GIC, Ocean-continental boundary, Space weather hazards, Geomagnetically induced currents, and Electrical engineering
    Creator: Pokhrel, Santosh, Rodriguez, Miguel, Bernabeu, Emanuel, Nguyen, Bach, and Simpson, Jamesina
    Owner: Santosh Pokhrel
    Location: Simulation
    Date Uploaded: 02/14/2018
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: Aug 2016 to Jan 2018
    Rights: Public Domain – This data is free of copyright restrictions (e.g. government sponsored data).
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S5PC30H5
    Contact Email: santosh.pokhrel1991@gmail.com
    Funders: NSF
  8. Data for: Restitution Characteristics of His Bundle and Working Myocardium in Isolated Rabbit Hearts

    Work
    Description: The Purkinje system (PS) and the His bundle have been recently implicated as an important driver of the rapid activation rate after 1-2 minutes of ventricular fibrillation (VF). It is unknown whether activations during VF propagate through the His-Purkinje system to other portions of the the working myocardium (WM). Little is known about restitution characteristic differences between the His bundle and working myocardium at short cycle lengths. In this study, rabbit hearts (n=9) were isolated, Langendorff- perfused, and electromechanically uncoupled with blebbistatin (10 μM). Pacing pulses were delivered directly to the His bundle. By using standard glass microelectrodes, action potentials duration (APD) from the His bundle and WM were obtained simultaneously over a wide range of stimulation cycle lengths (CL). The global F-test indicated that the two restitution curves of the His bundle and the WM are statistically significantly different (P<0.05). Also, the APD of the His bundle was significantly shorter than that of WM throughout the whole pacing course (P<0.001). The CL at which alternans developed in the His bundle vs. the WM were shorter for the His bundle (134.2±13.1ms vs. 148.3±13.3ms, P<0.01) and 2:1 block developed at a shorter CL in the His bundle than in WM (130.0±10.0 vs. 145.6±14.2ms, P<0.01). The His bundle APD was significantly shorter than that of WM under both slow and rapid pacing rates, which suggest that there may be an excitable gap during VF and that the His bundle may conduct wavefronts from one bundle branch to the other at short cycle lengths and during VF.
    Keyword: action potential duration, cardiology, microelectrode, His bundle, alternans, working myocardium, rabbit, ventricular fibrillation, and restitution curve
    Creator: Hu, Nan, Huang, Shangwei, Ranjan, Ravi, Panitchob, Nuttanont, Huang, Liqun, and Dosdall, Derek
    Owner: Nuttanont Panitchob
    Publisher: The Hive: University of Utah Data Repository
    Location: Salt Lake City, UT
    Date Uploaded: 10/12/2017
    Date Modified: 10/25/2018
    Date Created: 20160321 to 20160525
    Rights: CCO – As the data author, you are choosing to place your data into the public domain.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S50R9MJX
    Contact Email: Derek.Dosdall@utah.edu
    Funders: National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health