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  1. Archive of the High Resolution Rapid Refresh model

    Work
    Description: Weather-related research often requires synthesizing vast amounts of data that need archival solutions that are both economical and viable during and past the lifetime of the project. Public cloud computing services (e.g., from Amazon, Microsoft, or Google) or private clouds managed by research institutions are providing object data storage systems potentially appropriate for long-term archives of such large geophysical data sets. We illustrate the use of a private cloud object store developed by the Center for High Performance Computing (CHPC) at the University of Utah. Since early 2015, we have been archiving thousands of two-dimensional gridded fields (each one containing over 1.9 million values over the contiguous United States) from the High-Resolution Rapid Refresh (HRRR) data assimilation and forecast modeling system. The archive is being used for retrospective analyses of meteorological conditions during high-impact weather events, assessing the accuracy of the HRRR forecasts, and providing initial and boundary conditions for research simulations. The archive is accessible interactively and through automated download procedures for researchers at other institutions that can be tailored by the user to extract individual two-dimensional grids from within the highly compressed files. Characteristics of the CHPC object storage system are summarized relative to network file system storage or tape storage solutions. The CHPC storage system is proving to be a scalable, reliable, extensible, affordable, and usable archive solution for our research.
    Keyword: numerical weather prediction, analyses, data assimilation, weather, atmospheric science, and forecasts
    Subject: numerical weather prediction and atmospheric science
    Creator: Horel, John and Blaylock, Brian
    Contributor: NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory , NOAA Environmental Modeling Center, and University of Utah Center for High Performance Computing
    Owner: John Horel
    Publisher: University of Utah
    Location: Alaska and Contiguous United States
    Language: English and binary
    Date Uploaded: 08/24/2017
    Date Modified: 05/31/2018
    Date Created: April 18, 2015 to present
    Rights: CC BY – Allows others to use and share your data, even commercially, with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: 10.7278/S5JQ0Z5B
    Contact Email: brian.blaylock@utah.edu
  2. HPV Vaccine Survey Responses

    Work
    Description: Background: To assess the demographic and attitudinal factors associated with HPV vaccine initiation and completion among 18–26 year old women in Utah. Method: Between January 2013 and December 2013, we surveyed 325 women from the University of Utah Community Clinics about their HPV vaccine related beliefs and behaviors. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated from logistic regression models to identify variables related to HPV vaccine initiation and series completion. Results: Of the 325 participants, 204 (62.8 %) had initiated the vaccine and 159 (48.9 %) had completed the 3-dose series. The variables associated with HPV vaccine initiation were lower age (OR = 1.18 per year); being unmarried (OR = 3.62); not practicing organized religion (OR = 2.40); knowing how HPV spreads (OR = 6.29); knowing the connection between HPV and cervical cancer (OR = 3.90); a belief in the importance of preventive vaccination (OR = 2.45 per scale unit); strength of doctor recommendation (OR = 1.86 per scale unit); and whether a doctor’s recommendation was influential (OR = 1.70 per scale unit). These variables were also significantly associated with HPV vaccine completion. Conclusion: The implications of these findings may help inform policies and interventions focused on increasing HPV vaccination rates among young women. For example, without this information, programs might focus on HPV awareness; however, the results of this study illustrate that awareness is already high (near saturation) in target populations and other factors, such as strong and consistent physician recommendations, are more pivotal in increasing likelihood of vaccination. Additionally, our findings indicate the need for discussions of risk assessment be tailored to the young adult population.
    Keyword: Human Papillomavirus, Immunization, HPV, Vaccination, Vaccine series, Completion, Gardasil, and Intention
    Subject: Papillomavirus Vaccines and Patient Compliance
    Creator: Wilson, Andrew and Kepka, Deanna
    Contributor: Huntsman Cancer Foundation, University of Utah Primary Care Research Network, and Huntsman Cancer Institute
    Owner: Andrew Wilson
    Publisher: University of Utah
    Location: Utah
    Language: English
    Date Uploaded: 08/21/2017
    Date Modified: 05/21/2018
    Date Created: 20130101 to 20131231
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: doi:10.7278/S53B5X9S
  3. Pharmacokinetics of Locally Delivered Vancomycin to Bone

    Work
    Description: Current treatments for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections require intravenously delivered vancomycin; however, systemically delivered vancomycin has its problems. To determine the feasibility and safety of locally delivering vancomycin hydrochloride (~25 mg/Kg) to the medullary canal of long bones, we conducted a pharmacokinetics study using a rat tibia model. We found that administering the vancomycin intraosseously resulted in very low concentrations of vancomycin in the blood plasma and the muscle surrounding the tibia, reducing the risk for systemic toxicity, which is often seen with traditional intravenous administration of vancomycin. Additionally, we were able to inhibit the development of osteomyelitis in the tibia if the treatment was administered locally at the same time as a bacterial inoculum (i.e., Log10 7.82 CFU/mL or 6.62x107 CFU/mL), when compared to an untreated group. These findings suggest that local intramedullary vancomycin delivery can achieve sufficiently high local concentrations to prevent development of osteomyelitis while minimizing systemic toxicity.
    Keyword: antibiotics, pharmacokinetics, bone, and infections
    Subject: Infectious Diseases
    Creator: Loc-Carrillo, Catherine
    Contributor: Burr, Michael, Wu, Sijia, Churchill, John, Wang, Caroline, Hoerger, Kelly, Canden, Ahranee, Agarwal, Jay, Fernandez, Sheena, and Fredricksen, Hunter
    Owner: Catherine Loc Carrillo
    Publisher: The Hive: University of Utah Data Repository
    Location: Salt Lake City, UT
    Language: English
    Date Uploaded: 08/17/2017
    Date Modified: 08/07/2018
    Date Created: 20130501 - 20150130
    Rights: CC BY NC - Allows others to use and share your data non-commercially and with attribution.
    Resource Type: Dataset
    Identifier: https://doi.org/10.7278/S5W0942B
    Contact Email: c.loc.carrillo@hsc.utah.edu
    Funders: University of Utah Research Foundation
  4. Data for Almishaal et al. “Natural Killer Cells Attenuate Cytomegalovirus-induced Hearing Loss in Mice” PLoS Pathogens (2017)

    Work
    Description: The dataset includes scanning electron micrographs (SEM) and associated instrumentation settings. The data was generated as part of a larger study examining the mouse-strain specific susceptibility to murine cytomegalovirus (mCMV) dependent hearing loss. The included data documents that part of the study that quantified outer hair cell (OHC) loss. The entire study is documented in Almishaal et al. “Natural Killer Cells Attenuate Cytomegalovirus-induced Hearing Loss in Mice” PLoS Pathogens (2017).
    Keyword: murine model, cytomegalovirus, OHC, CMV, outer hair cells, hearing loss, scanning electron microscopy, SEM, C57BL/6, and BALB/c
    Creator: Firpo, Matthew A.
    Contributor: Ali A. Almishaal, Elaine Hillas, Albert H. Park, Jun Yang, and Pranav D. Mathur
    Owner: Matthew Firpo
    Publisher: University of Utah
    Location: Salt Lake City, Utah
    Language: English
    Date Uploaded: 07/27/2017
    Date Modified: 10/03/2017
    Date Created: 06/22/2017
    Rights: CC BY – Allows others to use and share your data, even commercially, with attribution.
    Resource Type: Image and Dataset
    Identifier: 10.7278/S5V69GR6
    Contact Email: matt.firpo@utah.edu
    Funders: Career Development Award from the Triological Society, National Institute of Health, and Research to Prevent Blindness Fund